Let our briefing generator help you get started

This challenge offers a unique way of choosing a brief: a generator. Climate change affects everything in our life, from our water to food, energy and housing. Use this online tool to help you pick the design brief that fits you best.

First, choose how you want to tackle a problem (with what design strategy), and then what you want to tackle. Finally, indicate where you want to do it — and hey, presto, a customised brief is generated for you.

Want to skip the generator? Get our complete background pack to see every available briefing. You can also download the topics, regions and approaches kits separately.

1. How
2. What
3. Where
Your brief

STEP 1: CHOOSE YOUR DESIGN APPROACH

Our desk research and interviews with experts led us to identify four design strategies at four different levels: communications, products, services, and systems. Choose an approach that stimulates you and that fits your idea best. You don’t have to be restricted to the strategy that sounds most like your discipline or day job. You may also think about collaborating with designers from other specialisations.

Communications

Design stories to help people imagine new ways of living amidst climate change. Designers are powerful storytellers. This communication skill is much needed to educate people about and help them imagine the changes they need to make in their lives to adapt to shortages or disasters caused by climate change.

Products and Spaces

Design products and environments that empower people to cope with climate change. The objects, buildings and places designers create can empower people to deal with the changes they will experience in their supply of water, food, and energy, and the threats to their home and health.

Services

Design services that help people to adapt to climate change together. A human centred approach is crucial for finding new ways to connect people online and offline to improve (or invent) services around water, food, energy, housing and healthcare, that help people to adapt to climate change.

Systems

Design system transformations that accelerate people’s adaptation to climate change. This is needed to make the many systems most people rely on (from food, water, healthcare, housing and energy) more resilient to climate change.

STEP 2: CHOOSE YOUR TOPIC

Climate change threatens the most basic necessities of life: food, water, shelter, energy. As such, it poses an enormous danger to our health. According to the most respected authorities on climate change adaptation, these five topics – and the way they interrelate – are where the biggest problems are.

Which climate change issue do you feel most compelled to explore solutions to?

Water

Climate change is all about water: either too little of it, with droughts, or too much of it, with rising sea levels, floods, intense rainfall and storms. The distribution of water on the planet is going to change, and that’s why water will become the next oil.

Energy

While our energy needs are still growing, higher temperatures put a strain on the grid. What's more, 97% of our electricity generation depends on water, which is increasingly in shortage. More frequent natural disasters also causes blackouts and damages energy infrastructure.

Food

Climate change means a drop in food production and a rise in their prices. Farmers have an enormous challenge to adapt their crops and livestock to the new climate.

Housing

Our homes are vulnerable to a changing climate. Higher temperatures, more wind, more rain, rising seas, sinking cities — we need to think about how to adapt our homes so that they protect us instead of endangering us.

Health

This is what the challenge is really all about. Extreme temperatures and more frequent natural disasters threaten our survival. Without a supply of the four essentials — water, food, housing, energy — our health will suffer.

STEP 3: CHOOSE YOUR PROJECT REGION & CONTEXT

The consequences of climate change are not evenly distributed around the globe. Unfortunately, the poorest and most vulnerable regions — Sub Saharan Africa and South-East Asia — will feel the brunt of it. But that doesn’t mean that other regions are “safe”. We provide a continental overview of the possible consequences here.

Of course, we encourage you to do your own research on the intended location of your project. What are the key risks and opportunities of that particular region? Where can you make the biggest impact?

Selected region:

  • Africa

    Africa is suffering from water shortages, reduced food supply, and increases in water and insect-spread diseases as a result of climate change. A lack of fresh water causes hunger and poverty, which are both drivers behind migration and conflict. Climate change will also increase desertification and soil depletion — roughly 65 per cent of Africa’s land is already degraded — putting even more pressure on food production. Pests and crop diseases are also on the rise due to climate change.

    Droughts will also hit Africa’s energy supply, as many countries rely on hydro-electric dams. It is particularly important to ensure a supply of clean energy in Africa to replace indoor cooking fires and stoves where wood, animal dung, crop waste or coal is burnt, since the fumes they emit kill 600,000 people in Africa every year.

  • Asia

    Asia is suffering from increasingly frequent and intense droughts and floods, while higher temperatures are already pushing the limits of human tolerance during summer, and may eventually cause some areas to become uninhabitable. Heatwaves in dry regions are already causing water and food shortages. More than 2.2 billion people in the Asia Pacific region rely on agriculture for their livelihoods, but production cannot catch up with the population increase in the region.

    Increased flooding is another major consequence: 97 percent of the 2.3 billion people affected by flooding between 1995-2015 lived in Asia. Rising seas are expected to cause flooding in coastal areas and on islands, while increased rainfall will cause floods in river basins and urban areas.

  • North America

    Parts of North America will be hit badly by extreme heat, which will have implications for health and agriculture. In some areas, extreme heat will be accompanied by a lack of rainfall and moisture, which will damage agriculture and spark more frequent and severe wildfires, as we are already seeing. There were 38 forest fire disasters be-tween 1995 and 2015 (UNISDR 2015), which caused injuries and deaths and heavily damaged ecosystems, houses and critical infrastructure.

    North America will also be hit by coastal and river flooding. Some coastal areas are in danger of being submerged by rising seas, displacing up to 13 million Americans by the end of this century. Flooding will heavily damage property and infrastructure, and disrupt supply chains, ecosystems and social systems.

  • Central and South America

    South America will be affected by water shortages, a fall in food production and quality, floods and landslides, and a spread of diseases transmitted by insects such as the Zika virus.

    Water shortages will hit semi-arid areas due to a lack of rainfall, while higher temperatures will reduce water availability in areas that depend on glacier melt, such as in the tropical Andes, where glaciers have shrunk by between 30 and 50 percent in the 30 years to 2013. Rainfall in the Amazon area is also expected to fall up to 40 percent. All of this will damage food production and agriculture. Energy will also be impacted in areas that depend on hydroelectricity.

    On the other end of the spectrum, heavy rainfall is already causing increasing frequent and intense floods and landslides. Tornadoes, which were once rare, will become more frequent.

  • Europe

    Europe will suffer from flooding in river basins and coasts, from water restrictions, and from wildfires. Both acute disasters and the long-term consequences of a changing climate will cause economic losses and reduce labour productivity.

    Extreme levels of rainfall are already causing frequent flooding. Increasing urbanisation is also a contributing factor to floods, as more built areas prevent the ground from absorbing rainfall. Coastal erosion and rising sea level due to melting ice-caps also threatens seaside populations with floods. Heatwaves are becoming more common in Europe, causing illnesses and health problems, particularly among the elderly. According to UNISDR, 90 percent of the total deaths relating to heatwaves were recorded in Europe (2015). Hotter summers will also lead to crop failure, which has enormous economic impact: droughts have cost over €100 billion in the past 30 years.

  • Oceania

    Low-lying coastal areas and small islands in the Pacific Ocean, such as the Marshall Islands, face possible submersion by rising seas, which will cause forced migration and/or necessitate relocation projects.

    The disappearance of the coral reef in Oceania, which have been damaged by the warming and acidification of the ocean, worsen this problem as coral protects coastal areas from waves and storm surges. Food sources and availability will be reduced, while livelihoods in farming, fishing and tourism could be at risk, which may deepen inequalities and cause mental health problems. Australia and New Zealand will also see more frequent and intense floods, which threaten damage to infrastructure and settlements. At the same time, heat-wave related deaths in Australian cities are expected to double over the next 40 years.

YOUR BRIEF:

Your brief:

WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE PEOPLE IN [location] TO ADOPT MORE RESILIENT FORMS OF HOUSING?

The Challenge:

Climate change will cause fresh water shortages, sometimes due to insufficient rainfall, and sometimes due to a breakdown of centralised water utilities. Irresponsible consumption and unfair distribution in these circumstances leads to other consequences such as illness, death and conflict.

The Opportunity:

Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories to educate people on the impact of their water consumption. This could involve empowering them to store their own water. Consider leveraging indigenous, traditional and local knowledge to prioritise water consumption where it is needed, or leveraging existing technologies and methods for managing water.

The approach:

Design stories to help people imagine new ways of living amidst climate change. Designers are powerful storytellers. This communication skill is much needed to educate people about and help them imagine the changes they need to make in their lives to adapt to shortages or disasters caused by climate change.

The Topic:

Climate change is all about water: either too little of it, with droughts, or too much of it, with rising sea levels, floods, intense rainfall and storms. The distribution of water on the planet is going to change, and that’s why water will become the next oil.

The Location:

Asia is suffering from increasingly frequent and intense droughts and floods, while higher temperatures are already pushing the limits of human tolerance during summer, and may eventually cause some areas to become uninhabitable. Heatwaves in dry regions are already causing water and food shortages. More than 2.2 billion people in the Asia Pacific region rely on agriculture for their livelihoods, but production cannot catch up with the population increase in the region. Increased flooding is another major consequence: 97 percent of the 2.3 billion people affected by flooding between 1995-2015 lived in Asia. Rising seas are expected to cause flooding in coastal areas and on islands, while increased rainfall will cause floods in river basins and urban areas.
  • communications
    energy

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE PEOPLE TO COPE WITH ENERGY SHORTAGES OR BLACKOUTS IN [region]?

    Consequences of climate change such as extreme or unusual temperatures and natural disasters can reduce access to energy. For example, storms can damage powerlines, while floods can destroy firewood. High demand for energy during heatwaves and prolonged cold weather can also cause blackouts due to strain on the grid. In many cases, individuals are ill-equipped to
    cope without energy.

    Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories to teach people how to cope with energy shortages while still fulfilling their daily needs. This could be done by raising awareness about how renewable technologies can be used in place of conventional energy sources, or by showing people how to use passive solutions involving ventilation, insulation and sunlight. You could also educate people on how to reduce and prioritise energy consumption.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-commsxenergy.pdf
  • communications
    food

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE CHANGE IN THE PEOPLE OF [region]’S EATING HABITS?

    Changes in the climate mean that food sources we are used to eating may no longer be available. Extremely high and low temperatures can destroy crops and kill livestock and marine life, while a higher incidence of pathogenic bacteria due to hot temperatures could make some foods more dangerous to eat. We need to learn to eat differently to avoid food shortages and famine.

    Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories to show people how an alternative diet of ‘climate-change-proof’ foods can be even more delicious, convenient, affordable or healthy than their current diet. This could be achieved by educating consumers about biodiversity, ecosystems and food sources, possibly using local, traditional or indigenous knowledge.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-commsxfood.pdf
  • communications
    health

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE PEOPLE TO REDUCE THE HEALTH RISKS CAUSED BY EXTREME WEATHER IN [region]?

    Higher temperatures will cause heat-related deaths and illnesses, and worsen air quality, causing respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Burning conventional fuels also produces toxic air. Mosquitoes and ticks will also thrive in hotter weather, leading to a higher infection rate of malaria, dengue, and Lyme disease. Higher temperatures will also breed more pathogenic bacteria in food and water, leading to diarrhoea.

    Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories that educate people about existing and accessible practices to prevent illness and infection. Think about the ways in which hygiene and sanitation practices have been spread and taught. Explore ways in which people can be empowered to live their life to the fullest without falling sick. If your region is not at risk from heat-related disease, consider how to combat air pollution from conventional energy sources.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-commsxhealth.pdf
  • communications
    housing

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE PEOPLE IN [region] TO ADOPT MORE RESILIENT FORMS OF HOUSING?

    Many people live in homes that will be damaged or destroyed by rising seas, storms, floods and heatwaves caused by climate change, possibly endangering their life. Many of them find it difficult to consider moving or significantly adapting their home due to financial, social, personal and cultural factors.

    Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories that empower people to strengthen their own homes or relocate to avoid damage due to climate change. You could explore how to raise awareness about the need for relocation due to climate risk. This could be achieved by demonstrating the additional benefits of moving or adapting homes, such as higher quality of life or better health. It could also be achieved by educating people about how to adapt their homes using existing, affordable and accessible technologies.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-commsxhousing.pdf
  • communications
    water

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO INSPIRE PEOPLE IN [region] CONSUME WATER MORE
    RESPONSIBLY?

    Climate change will cause fresh water shortages, sometimes due to insufficient rainfall, and sometimes due to a breakdown of centralised water utilities. Irresponsible consumption and unfair distribution in these circumstances leads to other consequences such as illness, death and conflict.

    Create and deliver stories that build on real-life personal stories to educate people on the impact of their water consumption. This could involve empowering them to store their own water. Consider leveraging indigenous, traditional and local knowledge to prioritise water consumption where it is needed, or leveraging existing technologies and methods for managing water.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-commsxwater.pdf
  • products-and-spaces
    energy

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO EMPOWER PEOPLE IN [region] TO BECOME ENERGY INDEPENDENT?

    Relying on carbon-based energy sources such as oil, coal or firewood makes people vulnerable to the consequences of climate change. Power lines, energy infrastructure and energy sources such as firewood are damaged by storms and natural disasters, including floods. Water shortages can stop thermoelectric and hydropower electricity generation. Heatwaves are often accompanied by blackouts as the need for cooling puts a heavy strain on the power grid.

    Consider how to enable more people to generate and control their own energy supply. Think about scaling existing renewable technologies in a more affordable, accessible, convenient or attractive form. Ensure that such devices or systems can withstand extreme weather.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-productsspacesxenergy.pdf
  • products-and-spaces
    food

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO EMPOWER PEOPLE IN [region] TO PRODUCE FOOD IN A CHANGING CLIMATE?

    Changing temperatures, rainfall and unusual weather patterns makes it difficult to produce food as we have done in the past. Extreme temperatures make it difficult to grow crops, keep livestock healthy, and store food. The acidification and warming of the oceans threatens fish and other marine life that are part of our diets.

    Consider improving cropping, livestock and aquaculture practices to make them more resilient to climate change. This could involve new storage methods that can withstand unusual or extreme temperatures, or ways of protecting livestock and crops from temperature extremes and water shortages. Another option could be to grow more food locally to increase self-sufficiency and resilience.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-productsspacesxfood.pdf
  • products-and-spaces
    health

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO EMPOWER PEOPLE LIVING IN [region] TO AVOID THE HEALTH RISKS AVOIDED WITH CLIMATE CHANGE?

    Higher temperatures will cause heat-related deaths and illnesses. Air pollution, already a problem due to the burning of conventional fuels, will worsen, causing respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Pollen counts will rise, increasing the incidence of asthma. Mosquitoes and ticks will also thrive in hotter weather, leading to a higher infection rate of malaria, dengue, and Lyme disease. Higher temperatures will also breed more pathogenic bacteria in food and water, leading to diarrhoea.

    Consider creating a simple non-medical product that can prevent illness and disease, such as a mosquito net, gloves, or masks. Alternatively, you could consider making an existing vaccination, disinfection or sanitation solution more accessible and affordable to people, perhaps by making it available through a non-medical outlet. Consider how to empower people to protect themselves against air pollution.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-productsspacesxhealth.pdf
  • products-and-spaces
    housing

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO PROVIDE AFFORDABLE DISASTER-PROOF HOUSING IN [region]?

    Climate change brings new weather conditions that most homes are not prepared for. Natural disasters such as floods or storms can damage or destroy homes, leaving many people homeless. Shelters are often inadequate and uncomfortable, partly because they are far away from the environments that people are used to.

    Consider creating affordable homes that safeguard people living in areas that are at risk from climate change consequences such as rising seas, floods, landslides and heatwaves. Think about how to strengthen existing homes so people don’t have to move. Explore the use of passive heating and cooling technologies and renewable energy to ensure that the homes still have energy
    after natural disasters.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-productsspacesxhousing.pdf
  • products-and-spaces
    water

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO EMPOWER PEOPLE TO UTILISE MORE NATURAL WATER SOURCES IN [region]?

    Climate change is creating new water shortages and worsening existing ones around the world. An over-reliance on ‘invisible’ water sources such as centralised utilities or boreholes can make people more vulnerable to droughts, which can cause food shortages, illness and even death.

    Consider making a way for people to store and filter water from natural sources, such as rainwater, seawater, or water from lakes. Think about how to make it easy for everyone to maintain a personal source of water as a ‘buffer’ during droughts, and ways to reuse wastewater. Consider the need for a filter and a signal that the water is safe to drink so that people can trust their water.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-productsspacesxwater.pdf
  • services
    energy

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO GIVE EVERYONE IN [region] ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE
    RENEWABLE ENERGY?

    The more extreme temperatures that will come with climate change will hit the poor disproportionately hard, because many can’t afford heating or cooling. Energy shortages caused by natural disasters that damage infrastructure and fuel sources will also hit the poorest and most vulnerable members of society the hardest, affecting their health and livelihoods.

    Consider how to spread renewable energy by making it more convenient and affordable to switch to from conventional or common energy sources such as oil, gas, coal and firewood. Think about how to make this available to the poorest and most vulnerable members of society, possibly by introducing community-owned renewable energy assets. Explore the possibility of increasing access to ‘passive’ heating and cooling methods, such as ventilation, insulation and solar heaters and cookers.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-servicesxenergy.pdf
  • services
    food

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO CREATE SERVICES THAT PROVIDE ENOUGH FOOD FOR THE POOREST PEOPLE IN [region] WHEN CLIMATE CHANGE MAKES FOOD MORE EXPENSIVE?

    Climate change will make food scarcer, as extreme temperatures, floods, rising seas and acidifying oceans will damage or destroy common food sources. This will make food more expensive, and in many areas, it will lead to famine. The poorest and most vulnerable members of society will be most affected by a poor diet and malnutrition.

    Explore how food could be more equitably distributed to the poorest people during food shortages due to climate factors. Consider what kinds of foods are likely to remain available and what surplus or waste foods could be ‘rescued’ and re-distributed. Think about how the chain of middlemen between consumer and producers could be shortened to make the relationship more direct, and therefore more resilient than the current system.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-servicesxfood.pdf
  • services
    health

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO CREATE SERVICES IN [region] TO SPREAD TREATMENTS FOR DISEASES AND INFECTIONS RELATED TO CLIMATE CHANGE?

    Higher temperatures will cause heat-related deaths and illnesses. Air pollution, already a problem due to the burning of conventional fuels, will worsen, causing respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Pollen counts will rise, increasing the incidence of asthma. Mosquitoes and ticks will also thrive in hotter weather, leading to a higher infection rate of malaria, dengue, and Lyme disease. Cases of diarrhoea and gastrointestinal diseases will also increase, as higher temperatures result in more pathogenic bacteria in food and water.

    Consider how you can scale existing treatments and methods to help prevent the spread of diseases, infections and illnesses linked to climate change. Explore how existing treatments for diseases could be made quickly available after disasters.Think about how you can leverage existing relationships and community ties, such as schools, workplaces and religious groups to
    spread access to treatment, particularly after disasters.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-servicesxhealth.pdf
  • services
    housing

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO FOSTER/STRENGTHEN NEIGHBOURHOOD TIES IN [region] TO INCREASE DISASTER RESILIENCE?

    The impact of climate change is magnified by social isolation: when neighbours do not know each other, they are more likely to be injured or killed in natural disasters. They are also more likely to suffer damage to their homes if they don’t assess risk and protect their neighbourhood collectively.
    Recovering from a natural disaster or coping with the consequences of climate change is harder when people act alone.

    Consider how to encourage neighbourhoods to co-create disaster risk management plans and practices. These could be an evacuation plan in the event of a natural disaster, or regular check-ins with neighbours during heatwaves or snowstorms. Explore how communities can map and assess risk together. Consider leveraging existing local networks (such as schools, religious institutions, workplaces) for spreading knowledge on disaster preparedness and awareness.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-servicesxhousing.pdf
  • services
    water

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO EMPOWER PEOPLE IN [region] TO PREVENT WATER DISASTERS OR WATER SHORTAGES?

    Climate change is causing more frequent and intense floods and droughts. People are more vulnerable to drought when they rely on water sources that are either unreliable (rainfall) or invisible (boreholes, reservoirs managed by central utilities), and more vulnerable to floods when their environment is ill-prepared.

    To combat drought, consider making a service in which water is a collectively-managed resource. Think about how to solve unequal access to water between different groups of people. To defend against floods, consider creating a service where people can collectively assess risk and co-create

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-servicesxwater.pdf
  • systems
    energy

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO MAKE ENERGY SYSTEMS IN [region] MORE RESILIENT TO CLIMATE CHANGE?

    Both large scale centralised grids and local energy sources such as firewood and biomass are vulnerable to the increasingly frequent and severe natural disasters and extreme temperatures caused by climate change. Alternative energy systems exist, but are not accessible by everyone.

    Consider strengthening existing renewable energy solutions so that they can scale to become a feasible alternative to the current system. This could be implemented through community ownership of energy infrastructure. Ensure that the system is resilient to external shocks and that it can supply current and near-future energy demand.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-systemsxenergy.pdf
  • systems
    food

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO STRENGTHEN AND PROTECT ECOSYSTEMS IN [region] THAT OUR FOOD DEPENDS ON?

    Modern agricultural and urban planning practices cause desertification, depleted soil, and decreases diversity of plant and animal species, all of which make our future food supply more vulnerable to changes in the climate.

    Consider how to better preserve and encourage local biodiversity within mainstream farming or urban construction practices. This could be achieved by enriching depleted soil, combating desertification, preventing overfishing or over-hunting, or creating a system to grow food in harmony with the changing water cycle. Consider methods that have worked on a small scale, such as permaculture and holistic grasslands management.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-systemsxfood.pdf
  • systems
    health

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO STRENGTHEN HEALTH CARE IN [region] TO REDUCE THE HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLIMATE CHANGE?

    Higher temperatures will cause heat-related deaths and illnesses. Air pollution, already a problem due to the burning of conventional fuels, will worsen, causing respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Pollen counts will rise, increasing the incidence of asthma. Mosquitoes and ticks will also thrive in hotter weather, leading to a higher infection rate of malaria, dengue, and Lyme disease. Cases of diarrhoea and gastrointestinal diseases will also increase, as higher temperatures result in more pathogenic bacteria in food and water.

    Consider how to scale existing projects that have improved health outcomes. Think about how an alternative awareness, prevention or treatment system that starts as a grassroots effort could replace the current system. Explore the role of sanitation, vaccination and protection from air pollution in the prevention of illness and disease.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-systemsxhealth.pdf
  • systems
    housing

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO SUCCESSFULLY PROTECT PEOPLE IN [region] TO PREVENT OR RESPOND TO DISASTER?

    Rising seas, floods and storms threaten to submerge and destroy many human settlements. Intense temperatures and droughts will force people to migrate from others. There are many personal, social, financial and cultural reasons preventing people from moving preemptively.

    Think about how to smoothly relocate people to areas that are less threatened by climate change, and how to prevent more people from moving to a risk area. Consider how you could design or plan a long-term settlement solution for a community who is at threat. Think about the things that people require in such a situation, including psychological safety and comfort.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-systemsxhousing.pdf
  • systems
    water

    WHAT CAN DESIGN DO TO SCALE WATER SYSTEMS TO PROTECT AGAINST FLOODS AND/
    OR DROUGHTS IN [region]?

    Sea levels are rising due to melting ice caps. Disruptions to the water cycle due to climate change are making floods and droughts more common and more intense. Higher global temperatures are also increasing demand for fresh water resources. Under these circumstances, an over-reliance on centralised water utilities or ‘invisible’ water sources such as boreholes increases people’s vulnerability.

    Consider how to scale water systems that have already worked on a small scale. Think about the need for efficient and distributed rainwater collection or desalination techniques in drought-prone regions; think about flood defences and preventative measures in areas prone to flooding.

    http://challenge.whatdesigncando.com//app/assets/wdcdchallenge-briefingsskit-systemsxwater.pdf